ARTS@DRCLAS


Mission:
ARTS@DRCLAS seeks to foster and develop the scope of Latin American visual, verbal and performing arts at Harvard University through exhibitions, conferences and performances hosted by the David Rockefeller Center local and overseas offices. Through events and exhibitions organized in collaboration with specific departments and faculty, and aligned with course-content within Harvard, ARTS @ DRCLAS serves as a resource for students and faculty working in the arts and strives to ensure academic presence, expand research and contribute to the University’s teaching mission. In Latin America, the program seeks to strengthen ties between Harvard and local art institutions and facilitate Harvard presence in the region.

Initiatives:
- One-time Events serve as a platform to respond to the interests of Faculty and students
Ongoing Collaborations are designed to establish long-lasting and in-depth relationships with other departments and art initiatives throughout the University
Exhibitions @1730 feature Latino and Latin American visual arts on a daily basis at DRCLAS Offices. Exhibitions typically are on display for one semester.
- Overseas Faculty Series are designed to create public activities and research projects overseas with the collaboration of faculty.
- Arts and Sciences Workshop is a faculty initiative chaired and moderated by Romance Languages and Literatures Professor Mariano Siskind. 

For more information please contact:
ARTS @ DRCLAS Program Manager for Cambridge and Overseas Offices Marcela Ramos 
ARTS @ DRCLAS Film Program Manager Paola Ibarra 


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2014-15 Program Overview

Since its founding in 2010, the Center’s ARTS@DRCLAS Program has sought to foster and develop the scope of Latin American visual and performing arts at Harvard University through exhibitions, conferences and performances organized in collaboration with specific departments and faculty, and aligned with course-content within Harvard. In Latin America, the Program has focused on strengthening ties between Harvard and local art institutions and facilitating the University’s presence in the region.

In 2014-2015, ARTS@DRCLAS organized two exhibitions in Cambridge as part of the Exhibits at 1730 Cambridge Series. During the spring semester, The Ephemeral City: Looking at Temporary Landscapes of Religion in South Asia and Latin America presented 10 cases of occupation of urban spaces that demonstrate powerful ways in which the public realm is temporarily appropriated to create sacred spaces. The exhibition, organized in collaboration with the South Asia Institute, was based on Professor Rahul Mehrotra’s (GSD) research on the Ephemeral City, which has been engaged in documenting and systematically compiling different forms of temporary urbanism worldwide. A panel featuring Harvard scholars Felipe Hernández (GSD), Marianne Potvin (FAS), and Luis Valenzuela (GSD) was held in conjunction with the exhibition fostering a conversation across disciplines about ephemerality in the landscapes of South Asian and Latin American cities.  

During the fall semester, the Center’s exhibition space was dedicated to the DRCLAS 20 Years exhibition created by Moore Moscowitz Design to commemorate the Center’s 20th anniversary. Latin America in the 60’s: Color Images by Martin Karplus, was on view in the spring at the Fisher Family Commons and showcased photographs taken by Harvard Professor Emeritus and winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Martin Karplus, during trips to Mexico, Brazil and Peru in the 1960s.

As part of its ongoing collaborations, designed to establish long-lasting and in-depth relationships with arts initiatives throughout the University, the Program organized and co-sponsored various activities, including: the ARTS@DRCLAS-Graduate School of Design Speaker Series, featuring architect Fabrizzio Gallanti’s research Las Ciudades del Boom: Economic Growth, Urban Life and Architecture in Latin American Cities 1989-2014; the ARTS@DRCLAS-Romance Languages and Literatures Series presenting lectures by Argentine theatre director Vivi Tellas and Puerto Rican performance artist Josefina Baez who also participated in the open studio of the Spanish 70c: Introduction to US Latino/a literatures course; the ARTS@DRCLAS-Graduate Student Speaker Series featuring Silvio Torres Saillant as guest speaker in the Spanish 254: Imagining Caribbean Communities course; and the fifth iteration of the Spring Music Concert, featuring dance music from Northeastern Brazil by Harvard-affiliated music group Forro Zazumbeca. Building up on the research project originated in the region during spring 2014, Critical Design and Research for Informal Learning, the program co-organized at the Graduate School of Design a week-long workshop led by Professor Krzysztof Wodiczko (GSD) and taught by the Dean of Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez School of Design Sergio Araya and Professor Orkan Telhan from the University of Pennsylvania School of Art.

The DRCLAS Film Series featured Beyond Samba: The Musical Others of Brazilian Counterculture in conjunction with the Brazil Studies Program and the department of Romance Languages and Literatures. The series consisted of five films and commentary by scholars in film and music from the Boston area. With the Cuban Studies Program and the Afro-Latin American Institute at the Hutchins Center, the Film Series presented the documentary Reembarque/Reshipment, followed by a conversation with director Gloria Rolando and professor Alejandro de la Fuente. During the spring semester, and in collaboration with the Mexico and Central America Program and Office the Film Series co-sponsored a screening of the documentary h2o.mx, followed by a discussion with director Jose Cohen, as part of the Mexican Cities Initiative events led by professor Diane Davis (GSD). This documentary screening had a follow-up session with the director, hosted in Mexico City by Laboratorio para la Ciudad, strengthening the presence of the Center and ARTS@DRCLAS abroad.

The fifth ARTS@DRCLAS-Harvard Film Archive Retrospective featured Mexican filmmaker Fernando Eimbcke over three days of screenings and dialogue with the director. Also with the Harvard Film Archive, ARTS@DRCLAS featured two of the most relevant contemporary Argentine filmmakers, Martín Rejtman and Matías Piñeiro, with a two-days screening and discussion of their latest work.

In Latin America, ARTS@DRCLAS continued to expand its network throughout the region developing the Overseas Faculty Series designed to create academic and public activities and develop research projects overseas with the collaboration of faculty. During the fall semester the program organized the symposium, exhibition and presentation of the book Ecological Urbanism in Santiago, Chile and São Paulo, Brazil. The event, organized in collaboration with the Brazil Office and several local institutions, attracted more than 250 people in each city and included presentations by GSD Dean Mohsen Mostafavi and GSD faculty, Charles Waldheim, Diane Davis
and
Gareth Doherty
among other scholars and practitioners from Chile, Argentina, Ecuador and Brazil. Harvard faculty also offered several specific workshops in each hosting institution with local students and faculty.  

ARTS@DRCLAS also organized a series of round table on Chilean Contemporary Art in Santiago, Chile, in collaboration with the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC) and the Museo de la Solidaridad Salvador Allende (MSSA). The roundtable discussions are part of the Conceptual Stumblings research project, a revision of the last 40 years of visual arts in Chile that aims to consolidate a new body of knowledge about Chilean contemporary art. Led by Assistant Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures Sergio Delgado and Professor Thomas Cummins (HAA) with the support of ARTS@DRCLAS and Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts Liz Munsell, the research team is working towards two goals: the production of a volume that brings together oral accounts, scholarly essays and visual material related to the period in
question; and the organization of an exhibition on Chilean art since
the 1970s which will be on view during the fall of 2015 at MSSA, in Santiago Chile and during the fall of 2016 at the Carpenter Center for Visual Arts in Cambridge.

During the spring, the Program collaborated with GSD visiting professor Luis Valenzuela (Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez) and the Chilean copper company Codelco in organizing the seminar Calama/CL: la minería y los territorios de extracción which was part of the Territorial Intelligence in Landscapes of Production course. In Mexico, the program collaborated with Ambulante, a non-profit organization that focuses on supporting and promoting documentary film as a tool for social and cultural transformation, in the organization of the workshop Paisajes sensoriales: cine y etnografía experimental which showcased work from the Harvard Sensory Ethnography Lab.

Through these activities ARTS @DRCLAS serves as a resource for students and faculty working in the arts and strives to ensure academic relevance, expand research and contribute to the University’s teaching mission. Detailed information on these and other related activities is included in the 2014-2015 DRCLAS Activities Report, as well as online at www.drclas.harvard.edu/arts.

2013-14 Program Overview

In 2013-2014, as part of ongoing collaborations designed to establish long-lasting and in-depth relationships with art initiatives throughout the University, ARTS@DRCLAS organized and co-sponsored various activities. They included: The Boston Latino International Film Festival; the ARTS@DRCLAS-Graduate School of Design Speaker Series, featuring Colombian Architect Giancarlo Mazzanti; the ARTS@DRCLAS-Latin GSD Series, featuring Laboratorio para la Ciudad, a new experimental space in Mexico City for reflection about the city; the ARTS@DRCLAS-Cultural Agents Series Reaccionacapulco, which presented the 2013 Conaculta prize winner; and the fourth iteration of the Spring Music Concert, featuring the work of Puerto Rican Choir Orféon San Juan Bautista, and presented at Harvard Memorial Church. This year, in collaboration with the Woodberry Poetry Room and the Romance Languages and Literatures department, ARTS@DRCLAS inaugurated the bi-annual Transversal Poetry Series –a poetry translation and trans-creation symposium that pairs Latin American Poets with Harvard-based translators, and features public lectures and workshops.

ARTS@DRCLAS also presented one-time events, which serve as a platform to respond to the interests of students and faculty. They included a dance studies panel on cross-temporal reenactments, cosmopolitan modernism and diasporic bodies, and a presentation on Porfirio Díaz by Argentine scholar Pablo Ariel Blitstein. It also co-sponsored the translation of Make Believe: Parafiction and Plausibility, a paper by Professor Carrie Lambert-Beatty (HAA-VES) to be published in an Argentine art journal, the 8th National Dominican Student Conference, and the Presencia Latina Festival.

The Program organized two exhibitions in Cambridge this year as part of the Exhibits at 1730 Cambridge Series, which features Latino and Latin American visual arts on a daily basis. Memory and Democracy in Latin American Poetry, curated by Professor Sergio Delgado (RLL), also part of the DRCLAS Democracy and Memory in Latin America Collaborative, showcased an installation of poems that formed and informed the collective memory of aspirations, repression, violence and resistance in the recent history of Latin American countries. The exhibition featured works by: Carmen Berenguer (Chile), Alejandra del Río (Chile), Luisa Fernanda Lindo (Peru), Nuno Ramos (Brazil), Octavio Paz (Mexico), Roque Dalton (El Salvador), Augusto de Campos (Brazil), Néstor Perlongher (Argentina), and Gonzalo Millán (Chile).  During the spring semester ARTS@DRCLAS co-organized, with the Harvard Art Museum, David Taylor: Working the Line. The exhibition, curated by Michelle Lamunière, documents the boundary monuments marking the United States-Mexico border and the associated activities—border security, drug and human smuggling, and ongoing construction that reflect the challenges of life on both sides. A panel was held in conjunction with the exhibition as part of the Harvard Art Museum Leventritt Lectures and, inspired by the exhibition photographs, students from the Harvard Radcliffe Dance Company will perform a piece during Harvard Arts First festival in May.

The fourth ARTS@DRCLAS-Harvard Film Archive Retrospective featured Chilean filmmaker Pablo Larraín over three days of screenings and dialogue with the director. The DRCLAS Film Series included five films and subsequent discussions about democracy and memory. They were: Cordero de Dios (Argentina) discussed by Marissa Navarro; La Teta Asustada (Peru), with Kimberly Theidon; O Ano em Que Meus Pais Sairam de Ferias (Brazil), with Nicolau Sevcenko; Nostalgia de la Luz (Chile), with Haden Guest; and O Dia que Durou 21 Anos (Brazil), with director Camilo Tavares. This year, both the ARTS@DRCLAS-HFA Film Retrospective and the DRCLAS Film Series supported the Democracy and Memory in Latin America collaborative conference in their programming.

During the spring semester, the DRCLAS Film Series and the Mexico & Central America Program also hosted a pre-release of the movie Cesar Chavez, followed by a discussion with director Diego Luna, producer Pablo Cruz and Professor Marshal Ganz (HKS). In conjunction with the Brazil Studies Program, the Film Series also featured a screening of the film Elena, with guest speakers Petra Costa (director) and Harvard professors Nicolau Sevcenko (RLL), Robb Moss (VES) and Lucien Castaing Taylor (VES).  

In Latin America, the ARTS@DRCLAS continued to strengthen ties between Harvard and local art institutions and to facilitate the University’s presence in the region. Julio Martins, curator of the 2012 ARTS@DRCLAS fall exhibition presented the book “through the surface of the pages...” at the fifth Feira de Arte Impressa Tijuana in São Paulo, Brazil. In Antigua, Guatemala, and as part of the in the artist residency Concepcion 41, Professor Jimena Canales (History of Science Department) participated in a dialogue about the production of the artist’s work and delivered a keynote address on the critical aspects of visual studies in science.

During the fall semester, the Program inaugurated the ARTS@DRCLAS Overseas Harvard Faculty Series with the visit of the Director of the Harvard Film Archive, Haden Guest, who participated in the Festival Internacional de Cine de Valdivia and in a seminar organized in collaboration with the Universidad Católica de Chile and the Cineteca Nacional. In April 2014, Professor Rahul Mehrotra, Chair of the Department of Urban Planning and Design (GSD) visited Santiago and Calama as part of this same series.  Planned as a bi-annual academic experience that included a public lecture, an open-door academic panel and a case study field trip, the four-day visit was organized in collaboration with the Design Lab, the Centro de Inteligencia Territorial of Universidad Adolfo Ibañez, and the Faculty of Architecture and Art from Universidad del Desarrollo, with the co-sponsorship of CalamaPLUS and Codelco.  

In 2014, ARTS@DRCLAS has begun to work closely with faculty leading two projects that were awarded funding through the Chile Innovation Fund. Conceptual Stumblings is a revision of relationships between aesthetics and politics that developed a new body of conceptual art after the coup in Chile, and is led by Professors Sergio Delgado and Thomas Cummins (FAS) and Liz Munsell of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Designing for Civic Engagement: Instruments of Expression, Dialogue and Collective Critique, which explores alternative forms of informal learning using new design technologies, is led by Professor Krzysztof Wodiczko (GSD). In June 2014, in Collaboration with Universidad Adolfo Ibañez, ARTS@DRCLAS organized professor Wodiczko’s visit to Chile to host a four-days workshop with students, a public talk and an interdisciplinary round table panel with artists, student movement leaders and government representatives. This first phase of the project will be followed by two workshops to be held during Fall 2014 at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design and at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

Detailed information on these and other related activities is included in the 2013-2014 DRCLAS Activities Report, as well as online at www.drclas.harvard.edu/arts

2012-13 Program Overview

In 2012-2013, ARTS@DRCLAS continued to foster Latin American visual, verbal and performing arts at Harvard through three types of innovative activities: ongoing collaborations designed to establish long lasting and in-depth relationships with art initiatives throughout the University; one-time events, which serve as a platform to respond to the interests of faculty, students and the community; and exhibits at 1730 Cambridge, which feature Latino and Latin American visual arts on a daily basis. In Latin America, the program focused on strengthening ties between Harvard and local art institutions and facilitating the University’s presence in the region. Through events and exhibits organized in conjunction with specific departments and faculty, and aligned with course-content within Harvard, ARTS@DRCLAS strives to ensure academic relevance, expand research and contribute to the University’s teaching mission.

As part of its ongoing collaborations, ARTS@DRCLAS organized or co-sponsored various activities, including: The  Boston  Latino International Film  Festival; the  ARTS@DRCLAS-Graduate School of  Design Speaker Series, featuring Colombian Architect Daniel Bonilla; the ARTS@DRCLAS-Woodberry Poetry Room Series, which showcased poetic actions by the art collective Casagrande; and the ARTS@DRCLAS-Brazil Seminar Series, at which Claudia Calirman presented her latest book “Brazilian Art under Dictatorship.” Other events included the third iteration of the Spring Music Concert, featuring the work of Boston-based musicians –a tribute to Brazilian musician and composer Luiz Gonzaga, theARTS@DRCLAS -Harvard Film Archive Retrospective, featuring the work of Mexican filmmaker Arturo Ripstein, and the ARTS@DRCLAS Graduate Student Series which featured Chilean architect Mario Marchant’s work at the GSD Design and Anthropology course (DES-03336-00). ARTS@DRCLAS also presented one-time events such as an interdisciplinary performance by NY-based Uruguayan artist Sabrina Lastman; a presentation on recent Cuban audiovisual creation introduced by Professor Carrie Lambert-Beatty (HAA-VES); and a music seminar and performance by Harvard based group MESDA (Music Education for Social Development Agency) in collaboration with Boston University College of Fine Arts and the Cultural Agents Initiative.

Additionally, the DRCLAS Film Series, which presents Latin American films in collaboration with other programmatic initiatives at the Center, included a screening of Ante la Ley, El Relato Prohibido de Carlos Correas (Argentina) and a conversation with film co-Director Emiliano Jelicie; La Forma Exacta de las Islas (Argentina) with film co-Director, Edgardo Dieleke; and La Brújula la Lleva el Muerto (Mexico) with film music composer and Harvard PhD student Edgar Barroso.

The Program organized five exhibitions in Cambridge this year. During the fall semester, Through the Surface of the Pages…, curated by Julio Martins, featured the work of 14 Brazilian contemporary artists and included a guided walk with the curator, a video art screening and the publication of a book. Latin America through the Eyes of Students (3), displayed the submissions of Harvard students who had traveled to Latin America to the Harvard Office of International Education Photo Contest. Engine, was a glimpse at the DRCLAS Permanent Collection’s piece bearing the same name by Chilean artist Mario Navarro. During  the   spring  semester  ARTS@DRCLAS  co-sponsored  the   exhibition  by   Cuban-born  artist Magdalena Campos-Pons entitled Something about Family, and curated by Portia Harcus at the W.E.B Du Bois Institute. In collaboration with the Andes Initiative, the Program organized Colombia, Tierra de Luz, which features the work of Colombian photographer Santiago Escobar Jaramillo who, through various art interventions and the use of light, responds to the problem of forced displacement in Colombia.

In  Latin  America,  ARTS@DRCLAS  organized  a  poetry  festival  that  brought  together  Argentinean, Chilean and Peruvian contemporary poets from the 1990s. The festival included academic workshops hosted by Universidad Diego Portales, one of which was moderated by Harvard professor Sergio Delagado (RLL) and public poetry readings hosted by the Museo de Artes Visuales (MAVI). Based on this regional initiative, a poetry translation and trans-creation symposium on the Southern Cone will be held at Harvard in collaboration with the Woodberry Poetry Room and the RLL department during the Fall 2013 semester. Complementing the  May  2013  Mining in  Latin  America  conference organized  by  the Center’s Andes Initiative, ARTS@DRCLAS will showcase the work of photographers Steve Cagan and Santiago Escobar Jaramillo at Universidad de los Andes in Bogota. In Addition, ARTS@DRCLAS is working on the edition of the Conceptual Stumblings: the Recasting of Chilean Visual Arts roundtable transcripts and expects this material to be made available to scholars and students and as it becomes the foundation for a book on Chilean visual arts.

2011-12 Program Overview

In 2011-12, ARTS@DRCLAS continued to foster and develop the scope of Latin American visual and performing arts at Harvard and in the region through three types of innovative activities: ongoing collaborations designed to establish long lasting and in-depth relationships with art initiatives throughout the University; one-time events, which served as a platforms to respond to the interests of faculty, students and the community; and Exhibits at 1730 Cambridge, which featured Latino and Latin American visual arts on a daily basis.

As part of its ongoing collaborations, ARTS@DRCLAS sponsored o co-sponsored various activities, including: the 10th anniversary of the Boston Latino International Film Festival; a conference and series of workshops led by visual artist Alfredo Jaar; the second version of the spring music concert, featuring the work of Harvard graduate student in music composition Edgar Barroso and Harvard undergraduate student Andres Ballesteros; the play Nuestra Señora de las Nubes organized by Harvard College TEATRO!; the Presencia Latina art festival; and an archive film retrospective in collaboration with the Harvard Film Archive, featuring the work of Nelson Pereira Dos Santos. This year, ARTS@DRCLAS also inaugurated a Graduate Student Series and a Film Series. The former allows graduate students to bring a visiting artist to the class in which they are teaching fellows. The DRCLAS Film Series presents Latin American films in collaboration with other programmatic initiatives at the Center. Film screenings are followed by panel discussions with producers, directors and expert scholars. In addition ARTS@DRCLAS and the Peabody Museum collaborated on an event entitled The Music of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, featuring Dr. Loco.

The Program also organized two exhibits. Held from October 2011 to March 2012, Latin America through the Eyes of Students featured all Latin American submissions from the Harvard Office of International Education (OIE) photo contest. Held from March to June 2012, Everyday Angles featured the work of five Latin American women artists currently living in Boston and New York. In June 2012, ARTS@DRCLAS held its first regional event: the poetry festival La Retaguardia. The festival convened Argentinean, Chilean and Peruvian contemporary poets from the 1990s in Santiago and featured poetry readings at the Museo de Artes Visuales (MAVI), literature workshops at the cultural center Balmaceda Arte Joven and academic workshops led by Harvard professor Sergio Delgado at Universidad Diego Portales. In addition, ARTS@DRCLAS supported the exhibit of Doméstica, an installation by the 2009 Art Forum winner Bernardo Oyarzún, at the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo in Santiago, Chile.

Through these activities organized in conjunction with specific departments and faculty, and aligned with course content at Harvard, ARTS@DRCLAS serves as a resource for students and faculty working in the arts and strives to ensure academic relevance, expand research and contribute to the University’s teaching mission.

Co-chairs: Diana Sorensen, Thomas B. F. Cummins