Security and Development Seminar: Inequality, Crime, and Development in Latin America

Date: 

Thursday, February 16, 2017, 4:30pm to 5:45pm

Location: 

Perkins Room (R-415), 4th Floor Rubenstein, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge

Speakers: Joao Pinho de Mello, Lemann Visiting Scholar at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Rodrigo R. Soares is Lemann Professor of Brazilian Public Policy and International and Public Affairs, Filipe R. Campante is Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and Emily Owens is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society at the University of California, Irvine

Led by Thomas Abt, Senior Research Fellow at CID, and Joao Manoel Pinho de Mello, Lemann Visiting Scholar at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, the sessions will feature presentations from prominent academics, practitioners, and policymakers.

This session will explore the causal relationships between inequality, crime, and violence, understanding the former as a both cause and effect of the latter. The relative importance of proximate vs. root causes of crime and violence will also be debated.

RSVP to cid@hks.harvard.edu.

 

pinho Joao Pinho de Mello, Lemann Visiting Scholar at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies. After receiving his PhD in Economics from Stanford University in 2005, João M P De Mello joined the faculty of the Economics Department at the Catholic University in Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), where he was an assistant (2005-2010) and an associate (2011–2014) professor. He is currently Professor of Economics at Insper. His research has focused on several areas of applied microeconomics. His work has been published in prestigious international academic journals and books, such as the Review of Economic StudiesReview of Economics and StatisticsEconomic JournalJournal of Money, Credit, and BankingJournal of Economic Behavior and OrganizationReview of FinanceEconomics of Education Review and Economía (Journal of LACEA). He is an affiliated member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences and a researcher of the Brazilian National Counsel of Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), the Brazilian equivalent of the National Science Foundation. Since 2011 he is the co-head of the America Latina Crime and Policy Network (AL CAPONE), a network of researchers sponsored by the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association (LACEA). In addition to academic activities, Prof. De Mello has worked extensively with the private sector, as a consultant, economic analyst and as expert witness in numerous litigation, arbitration and antitrust cases. He was a partner at Pacifico Gestão de Recursos until he joined the David Rockefeller Center of Latin American Studies as a Lemman Scholar and the Kennedy School of Government as a Fellow. He is currently a columnist with Folha de São Paulo, where he writes a fortnight article on economics.

rodrigo Rodrigo R. Soares is Lemann Professor of Brazilian Public Policy and International and Public Affairs. Professor Soares’ research centers on development economics, ranging from labor, human capital, and demographic economics, to crime. His work has appeared in various scientific journals, including American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Public Economics, and Journal of Development Economics, among various others. Before joining Columbia, Soares taught at the Sao Paulo School of Economics-FGV, PUC-Rio, the University of Maryland, and the Harvard School of Public Health. In 2006, he was awarded the Kenneth J. Arrow Award from the International Health Economics Association for the best paper published in the field of Health Economics. Soares is research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA, Germany), research affiliate at J-PAL Latin America, and associate editor of the Journal of Human Capital, of the Journal of Demographic Economics, and of the IZA Journal of Labor & Development. He has acted as consultant for the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, and state governments in Brazil on issues related to crime and violence, health, and development.  He received his Ph.D. in Economics under the guidance of Gary S. Becker at the University of Chicago in 2002.

filipe Filipe R. Campante is Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. He is interested in political economy, development economics, and urban/regional issues. His research looks at what constrains politicians and policy makers beyond formal checks and balances: cultural norms, institutions, media, political protest. In particular, it has focused on how these informal constraints are affected by the spatial distribution of people and economic activity, by access to information, by the evolution of cultural norms, and by the structure of the economy. He tries to answer these aggregate questions -- what happens to countries or states or cities -- with an applied microeconomic approach. Campante's work has appeared in leading academic journals such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, among others. It has also received multiple mentions in outlets such as the New York TimesScienceNPRWashington PostThe EconomistLos Angeles TimesForeign AffairsPolitico, among others. Campante is a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), and also affiliated with the Center for International Development, the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard. Born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, he holds a PhD from Harvard University, an MA from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, and a BA from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, all in economics.

owens Emily Owens is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society at the University of California, Irvine. She also holds a secondary appointment in the Department of Economics. Professor Owens studies a wide range of topics in the economics of crime, including policing, sentencing, and the impact of local public policies on criminal behavior. Her research examines how government policies affect the prevalence of criminal activity as well as how agents within the criminal justice system, particularly police, prosecutors, and judges, respond to policy changes. Professor Owens recently completed an NIJ-funded field experiment evaluating a police training program, and is engaged in ongoing research projects on alcohol regulation, immigration policy, and local economic development programs. Professor Owens received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland-College Park.

For more information, click here

This event is Co-sponsored with the Harvard Kennedy School's Brazilian Caucus and: 

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