Brazil Studies

2019 Oct 09

Occupying Schools, Occupying Land: How the Landless Workers Movement Transformed Brazilian Education

12:00pm

Location: 

CGIS South, S050, 1730 Cambridge Street

Speaker: Rebecca Tarlau, Assistant Professor of Education and of Labor and Employment Relations, Pennsylvania State University
Moderator: Sidney Chalhoub, Professor of History and of African and African American Studies, affiliated with Romance Languages and Literatures

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2019 Oct 03

Sacred Groves & Secret Parks: Orisha Landscapes in Brazil and West Africa

Repeats every day until Fri Oct 04 2019 .
9:00am to 4:00pm

9:00am to 4:00pm

Location: 

Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall Gund 112 Stubbins

The Sacred Groves and Secret Parks colloquium and exhibition will bring together insights on the materiality and spatiality of Afro-religious diasporic practices, decentering Western canons of knowledge and leading to new design possibilities for Brazilian and West African cities.

Landscapes of orisha devotion are often manifested as sacred groves, where devotees cultivate orishas—deities, or energies of nature, in Yoruba tradition that enable all forms of life—using combinations of botanical manipulation, animal sacrifice, music, and dance. In the process, Afro-diasporic memories...

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2019 Nov 19

Security Matters: Evidence from Brazil, Colombia and Mexico

12:00pm

Location: 

CGIS South, S216

Speakers: Graham Denyer Willis, Senior Lecturer, University of Cambridge; Annette Idler, Visiting Scholar WCFIA, Harvard University; Director of Studies of the Changing Character of War Centre, University of Oxford

Moderator: Diane Davis, Charles Dyer Norton Professor of Regional Planning and Urbanism, Graduate School of Design

Graham Denyer Willis is University Senior Lecturer in Development and Latin American Studies in the Department of Politics and International Studies at Cambridge University, and Fellow of...

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2019 Nov 06

On Brazilian Authoritarianism

12:00pm

Location: 

CGIS South, S050

Speaker: Lilia Moritz Schwarcz, Full Professor of Anthropology, the University of São Paulo (USP); Visiting Professor, Princeton University
Moderator: Sidney Chalhoub, Professor of History and of African and African American Studies, affiliated with Romance Languages and Literatures

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2020 Mar 09

Global History Seminar: Tâmis Parron, "Black Slavery and World Accumulation: Towards a Global History of Value"

4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

Robinson Hall, 35 Quincy Street, Lower Library

Speaker: Tâmis Parron, Research Professor, Department of History, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brazil
Moderator: Danielle N. Boaz, Visiting Fellow, WIGH; Stuart Hall Fellow, Hutchins Center for African and African-American Research, Harvard University; Assistant Professor of Africana Studies, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

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2020 Feb 06

Political Intermediation in the Digital Age: Is There A Way Out of Populism?

6:00pm to 8:00pm

Location: 

L-382 (Khan Room), Harvard Kennedy School, 79 JFK Street

Speaker: Miguel Lago, Lecturer of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University; Executive Director, Institute for Health Policy Studies

Moderator: Nathalie Gazzaneo, MPP candidate, HKS.

The rise of populism is directly connected to the crisis of trust in political parties, mainstream media and trade unions. But it is also connected to the emergence of social media, where intermediaries tend do be removed in different activities. Therefore, is there still room for political intermediation in the digital...

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